Thus Have I Read

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An American flag and photograph of the Buddha are prominently displayed in the barracks of the Portland Livestock Exposition Building, where Japanese Americans were interned. May 31, 1942 | Photograph courtesy The Oregonian / Barcroft Media

This morning I read an article in the Tricycle magazine and found it so forceful, I wanted to assure more people read it. That’s where you come in, and hopefully you’ll direct your friends and followers to check it out as well. For immediate, present moment relevance, just notice the crib in the above photograph.

At this time in our nation’s history when children as young as infants are being separated from parents at our southern border and held in tent encampments and other dreary facilities, we need to remember where this country has been. We may have thought we had moved beyond the paranoid ideation leading to the ensiling of the different, or alien, other. Au contraire. Here we are. We are being led by an individual who hawks lies and hatred purchased wholesale by the incurious and the uninformed. That there are so many of them appalls and frightens me. So, as Duncan Ryuken Williams quotes Nyogen Senzaki in this Tricycle piece,

The Buddha taught that identity is neither permanent nor disconnected from the realities of other identities. From this vantage point, America is a nation that is always dynamically evolving—a nation of becoming, its composition and character constantly transformed by migrations from many corners of the world, its promise made manifest not by an assertion of a singular or supremacist racial and religious identity, but by the recognition of the interconnected realities of a complex of peoples, cultures, and religions that enrich everyone.

Namasté,

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Just When you Think You’ve Got it

Good morning! Let us wake up and remember today is another important opportunity to practice mindfulness and gratitude, patience and courage. Less reactivity and more humility. Val Boyko reminds us we’re still on our path. Namasté 🙏 Shielagh

Find Your Middle Ground

unseen events “Forests Edge” Photo by Mike Bizeau at http://www.naturehasnoboss.com

Many of us continue our path into 2019. We are on a journey of curiosity, inner exploration, trying on new ideas, committing to better behaviors, taking care of ourselves … and taking time out to nourish mind, body and spirit.

We see ahead clearly and then something comes along to bring doubt, temptation, discomfort or rejection.

So soon… Really?

The most significant lessons are unexpected. And they often come along just when we were hoping or counting on something else.

Let them be wake up calls rather than obstacles in your mind.

Be alert. Wake up.

The class of your life is in session.

Take time to pause and reflect on the real lesson waiting to be seen.

p.s. My thanks to Mike Bizeau for the permission to share this image.

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Winds of Change

How beautiful this always awesome blog from a friend in Northern California that brings me smiles from playful chipmunks, oohs and aahs from gorgeous autumn leaves, and nods in glad remembrance of Thäy’s wise words today. Thank you, David!

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seeing sky streaming ~d nelson

Rising with sunshine, feeling
gratitude for a brand new day.
Vowing to bring happiness
during morning, to myself
& others; & reduce misery
in the afternoon.

15th holiday season for Fang the Terrible ~d nelson

Recently a friend said to me,
“life’s always been tough.”
Me: “yet, has it
ever been this tough for
so many at the same time?”

full fall color

Walking slowly in nearby park
taking in an array of natural expressions,
i.e. miracle of life, continuing
in all its hues & shades.

play chipmunks

Feeling gratitude for nature’s gift
of renewal & smiles
experienced when being with
mother earth’s plants & critters.
A few images for encouragement
to take a meditative walk in wilds.

May we offer each other,
whoever we are with,
supportive comfort,
warmth & little lights shining,
moving into this season’s
winds of change.

Impermanence makes everything possible.

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Revisiting the Why of What I Do

My Manhattan Office

How my New York office looked from where I sat for many years

Reposted from August 2016

[The panorama above of my Manhattan office shows so much of what has been important to me. The watercolor over the couch was painted by my mother, an accomplished artist, may she Rest in Peace. The stone Buddha head was a cherished gift that I gave a colleague when shlepping it home on the subway proved too daunting. The glowing shape near the far window is a Himalayan salt lamp. The green mid-century modern chair is the only furniture I brought with me to Florida where I now live and work. It sits in my garage awaiting refurbishing, its woven tape faded and badly snagged often and enthusiastically by the cat after I brought it home.]

In New York City where I practiced for over twenty years, it seemed as if everyone knew what psychotherapy is, even if they hadn’t ever experienced it personally. Occasionally I’d meet with an older patient whose primary physician or psychiatrist had referred them to me for treatment, and they’d say something like, “I don’t know why I’m here or what I’m supposed to do.” A discussion would follow, and soon we’d be “doing psychotherapy” every week. But many elderly people are psychotherapy-savvy, a case in point being a ninety year old woman in New York who had undergone a lengthy psychoanalysis fifty years before she came to me to address a current issue.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

So these days, I’m explaining psychotherapy a little more often, and helping shed a light on experiences that have baffled, frightened, confounded or annoyed my patients. I’m describing how certain medications treat depression and why they aren’t good for people with the mood swings of bipolar disorder.

photo of head bust print artwork

Photo by meo on Pexels.com

I’m cataloging symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and helping patients gauge how much those symptoms interfere with functioning and their overall quality of life. Sometimes just asking a question about obsessions triggers access to a deeper emotional issue never before spoken to another. As I was psychodynamically trained, I enjoy helping a patient explore a dream for its value in clarifying issues, past and current. I take my role as therapist and guide along this most challenging journey very seriously.

architecture bright building city

Flatiron Building, Photo by Kai Pilger on Pexels.com

As we prepared to move out of New York, I considered retiring. For about five minutes. I got a late start on my career as a psychologist so there’s a practical, financial incentive to continue, but there’s an even more important reason I am still actively working as a clinical psychologist who provides psychotherapy: I love the work. I enjoy meeting new people and sitting down with them to see what we can do together to alleviate their distress, resolve their conflicts, arrive at healthier alternatives to their problematic habits and behaviors, and find greater and deeper meaning in their lives, both in terms of the past, the present, and into the future.

person holding compass in forest

Photo by Tobias Aeppli on Pexels.com

I find it to be a great blessing helping people traverse very intense points on their path, such as dating, marriage or divorce; pregnancy, miscarriage, or birth; seeking, losing, improving or getting new jobs; illness, accident, treatment, death and grief, and as the late death and dying pioneer Dr. Elizabeth Kübler-Ross taught us, acceptance. Acceptance of what has been and of what is, even when we wish it were different. Acceptance of what we’ve done and who we are, and acceptance of our ability to learn and grow and change despite the past, even though it can be extremely challenging and a lot of hard work.

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I alway have ended these posts with the Sanskrit word namasté, which basically means, “The goodness in me bows to the goodness in you.”

And so it is.

Namasté,

 

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Solemnly Remembering Paradise

My friend David in Northern California posted this most timely and saddening blog post today. Thank you, David. Puts into perspective the fact that I stopped up the garbage disposal (again) with vegetable peelings 🙄. May the healing of body, heart and mind, and of our precious Mother Nature begin in every needed way.

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Ashes of Paradise (taken at noon Thursday) ~d nelson

Remembering that time when
my journey landed me upon
a special high forested mountainside,
inhabited, mostly, with friendly older folks,
who called the place Paradise.
Perhaps you can remember
such a pleasant place, yourself.

Ashes of Paradise 2 (taken at noon on Thursday)

Hadn’t thought about Paradise
for such a long time
until the other day when darkness
suddenly descended at noon
and its ashes rained down on my valley.
A local witness said it was like the gates of hell opened up.

Ashes of Paradise 5 ~usda

Breathing in (with a carbon filtered mask), I taste smoke, again.
Breathing out, clean carbon dioxide.
Sadly reflecting on those lost, newly homeless,
continued windy, bone-dry conditions,
realizing another catastrophic California inferno.
Details are easily found on current news & here.  (my local air quality below)

Ashes of Paradise 6 ~epa

As…

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No One is Above the Law

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It’s been a while since I’ve posted anything.

Life has been busy here as we continue to unpack, put away, and sometimes even donate or discard the contents of the many boxes of original art and many other things we shipped to our new full-time residence. As I’ve said before, we once were snowbirds and now are flamingos. Every week we’re cutting up cardboard to put out with the recycling. Medical appointments, regular exercise with walks, gym and pool, and endlessly shopping for fresh and healthy food as we eat to improve our wellbeing, all have taken up much of our time of late. It is what it is.

We voted here in Florida on the first day of early voting and watched the coverage late into Tuesday night. We’re thrilled about the blue wave of progressive women and men, veterans, many of them very young and some LGBT, some Native Americans, and all patriots. As an aging lefty, I am so glad the new guard has stepped up so energetically for our collective good. But that wave didn’t make it down here, unless recounts change the senate and gubernatorial races. And yesterday’s unhinged WH press conference, subsequent AG firing, and later the pulling of a journalist’s hard WH press pass after he stood his ground, should leave no doubt in our minds that an autocrat is swinging a cudgel wildly and is very, very dangerous.

If the firing of Jeff Sessions and elevation of a staffer who has called the Mueller investigation a “witch-hunt” to the position of acting attorney general has caused you to fear for our republic, take heart from the protests being held today at 5 pm local time nationwide. Check here to locate the gathering nearest to you. Even in very red SW FL, we have one right near us. It’s never too late to suit up and show up.

Namasté

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Under the Bodhi Tree and Serendipity

Good morning! My daily inbox treat from Tricycle magazine recently featured a promotion for a wonderful new children’s book called Under the Bodhi Tree, and this video of the book is narrated beautifully. The voice of Kriste Peoples is perfect for the text. The book gives a lyrical account of the awakening of Siddhartha Gautama.

Now that we’re more or less settled after the move, after just two weeks, I’m beginning to emerge from the state of intensity in which we’ve lived since June when we headed north to sell the house. It was a frenzy of decluttering, packing, making various arrangements and so forth. I even sold my Prius I had kept up there. The one big thing I forgot to do was have the satellite radio activated on my Florida car. It worked fine until Thursday when it shut down. Turns out there was a freebie period going on, and then it ended. So while we were parked in the Aldi lot before doing some food shopping, we called in and after a lengthy call got it reinstated.

We experienced an amazing confluence of kindness, generosity and serendipity over the last three and a half months. A friend and a cousin helped us empty the attic and sort the contents. We gave them art and lovely smaller things in gratitude. A neighbor came by to say goodbye and graciously took away the remaining contents of my refrigerator plus a wrought iron cupcake rack I was planning to leave behind. Despite a slow real estate market the wonderful realtor we chose did an amazing job and had us under contract in just over a week after the listing went live online. We sold some old jewelry and silver items we never used for just what the movers charged. We sent down 37 boxes of personal treasures and needs and a lot of original art. A main concern of mine was where I would put everything once it arrived. We sold the house fully furnished and equipped, so my lovely china closet stayed behind. My husband also needed a desk for his iMac, so we’d been visiting furniture and consignment stores this past week.

We found a stunning solid hardwood china cabinet at a consignment store. It had been sitting there for months so our lower offer was accepted, and we got it delivered yesterday. Now I have shelves awaiting my mother’s Blue Quail china and other much loved things. Right now it holds my butterfly tea set, some Fiesta pieces and a cast iron Dutch oven, just to fill the shelves for now. It’s 8 feet tall and beautifully made. It reminds me of an antique store window on the Rue Royale in the French Quarter.

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The heavy Murano Glass bowl on the top shelf was lovingly carried back from Italy by my mother in 1955 who held it on her lap on the plane. I have carried it everywhere I’ve lived since she died over 13 years ago. I stashed it in a big duffel bag well padded with clothing to bring it down to Florida two weeks ago. Spot the Buddha on the second shelf? I rescue any that I find and can afford (I once found one in an antique store in the Village that was very old and selling for $13,000. I didn’t take that one!) in thrift stores and antique places. This Buddha is a glass tealight candle holder.

Once we found this lovely piece, we redoubled our efforts to find the office furniture my husband needs. Everything we found was either too large for the space or two small for the iMac. We even found an office armoire of beautiful wood with all the bells and whistles, but it was very expensive and he didn’t love it. We looked online and mulled over many options. At last we found a number of suitable desks on Joss and Main (a Wayfair site) and chose a nice, simple one with a keyboard drawer that was inexpensive and looks easy to assemble. We’ll have it and the chair we chose by the end of the week. Easy peasy!

That’s it for now. It feels good to be blogging more regularly. Life changes, but there will always be interesting things to find and share.

Namasté

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