Your Weekly Diversion, Week 10

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A whirlwind week to be sure. Hearings, press conferences, tweets, accusations, retractions, awkward posturings, leader of the free world clowning in the cab of a semi like a ten-year-old kid, lies and obfuscations, more tortured logic, dead Russians, Russian guy thrown out a window and surviving, Russian guy poisoned (twice) and living to tell the tale, spy vs. spy, intel insanity, naïveté and contortive backstabbing. Whew!

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So to the diversions. First, is there a vacant lot that bugs you? Is your neighbor’s yard an eyesore? You need to learn how to be a guerilla gardener. It looks like a lot of fun and good for the planet besides. Like these nasturtiums. They could brighten that sorry corner.

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Sort of stressed about now? Maybe you need to meditate. You already do? Fantastic. Then hit that cushion and get your om on. My meditation practice has transformed my life in a good way. How else are we going to find our center in the midst of the circus? And remember, they ARE our monkeys. If you don’t have a sitting practice yet, Lion’s Roar has a meditation how-to to get you started.

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I enjoy cooking, and I collect cookbooks and I pin recipes I find online on Pinterest all the time. Now Mother Jones tells me I’m doing it all wrong. Curious?  Check this out.

And now for your musical reward for reading this blog today. Rock music! Neil Mendoza built a contraption that actually uses rocks to make music. You won’t believe it! Ok, maybe you will. “Here Comes the Sun!” Enjoy!

Namasté

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The Wisdom of John Lennon

After mind boggling untruths, illogical contortions and unanswered questions in the news these days, I savored this post by Christopher Chase of Creative Systems Thinking who gives us the wisdom of John Lennon.

Creative by Nature

“The thing the sixties did was to show us the possibilities and the responsibility that we all had. It wasn’t the answer. It just gave us a glimpse of the possibility.”

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“Love is like a precious plant. You can’t just accept it and leave it in the cupboard or just think it’s going to get on by itself. You’ve got to keep on watering it. You’ve got to really look after it and nurture it.”

“We live in a world where we have to hide to make love, while violence is practiced in broad daylight.”

“Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives. I think we’re being run by maniacs for maniacal ends and I think I’m liable to be put away as insane for expressing that. That’s what’s insane about it.”

“You don’t need anybody to tell you who you are or what you are. You are…

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Your Weekly Diversion, Week 9

 

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This week has brought the usual ups and downs, plus a deep down or two. Friends and family haves lost loved ones to death, and others have disappeared off the radar screen. Hearts are hurting. This tune by Holly Macve taps into that feeling, even if the words are rather dark and troubling.

But the sun has continued to shine and the birds have pursued their true loves with raucous and reckless abandon. We’ve seen and heard the noisy mating dances this week of boat-tailed grackles, graceful tricolored herons, and mockingbirds. Ah, Spring!

One of our downs: The post office misplaced the overnight mailer we sent to the accountant with all the tax documents. But we were able to speak to the postmaster who found it, with no idea why it was never delivered nor why it hadn’t been sent back to us. It was delivered that very day. So a down followed by a giddy up!

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Image courtesy of Dustin’ Shelves

Couldn’t resist that one!

Political highs and lows abound. The crazy continues but keeps running into roadblocks, thanks to highly principled jurists,  determined public servants and indefatigable civil rights advocates.

Some deserve more diversions than others, and all my followers and friends certainly do!

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Searching for ways to become more emotionally strong? Eric Barker provides some useful questions to ask ourselves, ups and downs notwithstanding. I’ve shared this with clients this week.

Hawaiian musician Kalani Pe’a provides the gentle swaying of this week’s closing number. You might find yourself transported to a beautiful Hawaiian island, kissed by the sun and gentle breeze and tantalized by the scent of its flowers as you listen.

Namasté

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Your Weekly Diversion, Week 8

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So how was your week?

Here in SW Florida we’ve been experiencing close proximity to a brushfire that devastated 7500 acres of pine scrub and palmettos and created a huge, mushrooming column of choking smoke that hung about for days. Only four rural structures were destroyed, and thankfully no one was hurt, but that smoke was epic. Here’s what we saw from our driveway on Tuesday.

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Collier County brushfire 3/7/17

The Collier County fire paled by comparison to the conflagration in Washington DC spawned by hot air, smoke and mirrors, hubris, hypocrisy, and paranoia. And, no, it isn’t the same on both sides.

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Photo courtesy of Travel Wires

Now for your diversions. Column of impressive smoke, you say? Italians can claim the prize, produced by Mount Etna this month.

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After all these fiery natural phenomena and irrational political bombast, I needed some good news. A man lost his beloved parrot. Thanks to an implanted ID chip, the parrot was found years later and reunited with his owner. You’ll have to read this to learn the change the parrot exhibited upon his return.

 

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Here’s another feel good diversion. When her dad wouldn’t do it, a business leader walked a lesbian bride down the aisle.

And I wouldn’t leave you without some good music. My cousin from Knoxville, Tennessee shared one of her favorite artists with me this weekend when she and her sister came for a fun visit. Here is Amos Lee and “Southern Girl.”

 

Namasté

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Why do you want this holy water? By Ajahn Chah

Practicing the dhamma (dharma) without expectation is the way of the Buddha. Doing something for its own sake as opposed to hoping for a reward is a transcendent experience. This post by Ajahn Chah explains it so well.

Buddhism now

Bridge over a Pond of Water Lilies, Claude Monet (French, Paris 1840–1926 Giverny) © The Metropolitan Museum of Art In the beginning we practise with a desire of some kind in mind; we practise on and on, but we don’t attain our desire. But if we continue to practise anyway, we reach a point where we’re practising without ideas of some kind of return; we just practise in order to let go. This is something we must see for ourselves; it’s very deep. Maybe we practise because we want to go to nibbana, but you won’t get to nibbana! It’s natural to want peace, but it’s not really correct. We must practise without wanting anything at all. If we don’t want anything at all, what will we get? We don’t get anything! The point is, whatever you get is a cause for suffering, so we practise ‘not getting anything’.

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Your Weekly Diversion, Week 7

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Here we are in week 7 of the Wacky World of American life. Schadenfreude notwithstanding, what a ride! My bet is that you either have a TV or get your news on a computer or mobile device, or even a radio. Maybe you read a real, paper newspaper, but you may be aware of how goofy some of the political machinations and contortions have gotten, and who foments false news and who is merely accused of doing so when they really tell the truth. If you do, I have some questions for you, and some great music.

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Photo courtesy Travels with Amy

Are you hankering to visit Havana? A travel agency in a strip mall near my home in SW Florida boasts a cruise to Cuba for $699 per person. How do you know which Cuba travel opportunity is right for you? Read this before you plan your trip.

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Hungry? Wouldn’t it be great to prep a full hot breakfast on your countertop? Check these out. I’d be happy to give several of them a home.

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Are you looking for love this year? Venus is in retrograde with Aries and Pisces. Not sure why that matters? Me either, but anything with “retrograde” gets my attention. Enough weird stuff has happened in my life when Mercury was in retrograde to make me respect the paths of the planets. The Old Farmers Almanac gIves the dates for Mercury in retrograde in 2017.

Maybe you just want to let the mystery be. Iris Dement’s lyrics tell us she does.

 

Namasté

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Treatise on the Wisdom of Living in the Now

 

I read this recently and found it a wonderful treatise on mindfulness, present-centeredness, and living more in the now. Although this too is a WordPress post, and I have reblogged Buddhism Now posts in the past, I wasn’t able to do it the usual way this time. So please keep in mind as you read my post that these are the words of Buddhist scholar Sir John Aske

Regular Everything
by John Aske

Posted on 24 February 2017 by Buddhism Now

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Stupa (chorten), 17th-18th century Tibet. Metropolitan Museum of Art

We all like things to be regular, and what’s wrong with that, you might reasonably ask? We all want stable conditions as well. We don’t want anything to change, either — we want it to stay the same — or more or less, always.

Having a regular job, regular meals and somewhere regular to sleep at night can only be good, better than sleeping in a ditch and being hungry all the time. The gravedigger at Drewsteignton preferred to sleep under a hedge, he told me, because a roof ‘made the place stuffy,’ but he was an unusual man.

But these are all physical conditions, and though they can strongly affect the way we behave and think (our views and opinions), we must be careful that they do not blind us to what is really happening. It is not so much what we have, but what we depend upon having, now and in the future, that gives us problems.

How often, acting upon our need for comfort and security, do we sacrifice our freedom and happiness? An old friend used rather ruthlessly to extract from people what they really wanted; it was often living in the South Seas in those days, though that sounds rather old hat now, with modern air travel. He then explained to them how easily they could fulfil their dreams. In virtually every case, he told me, they invented a thousand feeble excuses why they couldn’t. With the exception of Scott of the Antarctic and William Thesiger, we are nearly all terribly attracted to a conventional lifestyle.

That is one reason why the Buddhist sangha of monks and nuns is so vital. It consists of people (often quite successful people) who have gone into homelessness and given everything up to ‘follow their dream,’ as Joseph Campbell calls it. But even more than that, they know from what the Buddha taught that their dream is not a fantasy, but a greater reality. We cannot truly live in the moment — and that means truly live — if our minds live somewhere else: next month, next year, or often, sadly, last year.

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Ascetic Master, probably a Mahasiddha, Tibet, 17th century. Metropolitan Museum of Art

Fearing death, disease and taxes, we build a whole raft of tomorrows and sail off on it into the future. But it is not the future, it is a dream world that surely prevents us living our real lives and moments fully. We are so preoccupied with our self-created world, that we fail to see and attend to this one — the one in which we really live and of which we are a real part. When the fiction collapses in the face of change and disaster — as it periodically must — we are lost, for the world in which we find ourselves is one that seems to have been thrust upon us, and not of our choosing. Reality is certainly not of our choosing, but it is what it is and what we are, and until we recognise this, we will keep blundering around in the dark and banging into things we didn’t know were there. It’s like going to the lavatory during the night, half asleep. A natural need overtakes us and we know we have to go from point A to point B somewhere, but it is as if we have forgotten or never noticed the way before, and we collide with all sorts of obstacles that wouldn’t bother us in the light of day and in full consciousness. And it is just this full consciousness or rather awareness that is lacking in our daily lives. This unawareness is so comfortable and convenient to us in our daily lives, that we create obstacles where there would otherwise be none. Sometimes these obstacles are called ‘karma’.

Our obsession with things and targets prevents us seeing the ground beneath our feet and if we do look at it, it may be with dismay, for it is not quite as we want it to be or as we expect it to look, like coming back to an untidy room after a holiday.

Our minds are themselves like untidy rooms full of yesterdays and tomorrows, always chasing after this and that, seldom contented with what we have and where we are.

But the more we remain aware in these moments, the more remarkable they become, and the more we belong in them. The more we live truly in these moments, the more they lose their separateness, and the more we take — and are — everything as it comes.

(First published in the August 2006 Buddhism Now.)

Namasté

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