Your Weekly Diversion, Week 42

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It’s Week 42 and between current events, the change to daylight standard time, aches and pains from a challenging gym workout, technical difficulties in the house and other distractions, I almost forgot to publish a post this week.

Okay, diversions coming right up. Have you I noticed that the latest slim cable boxes no longer feature digital clocks? Sure, we wear watches and have our phones and tablets nearby, but still. So we decided to look for a reasonably priced, analog, table top clock. They aren’t so easy to find! Nothing except wall clocks and digital clocks at the local Bed, Bath and Beyond. Only a few we didn’t like at our TJ Maxx. Decorator outlets and fine jewelry stores have lovely ones at more than we wanted to spend. So we checked on Amazon and found some good ones.

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Here’s one we liked enough to buy

 

I checked through the ideas I save on Google Keep for future posts and thought this piece on the herb turmeric might be interesting to my readers.

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There have been so many wild health claims made about turmeric that I was pleased to see that Memorial Sloan Kettering covers it here.  Turmeric is a rhizome, similar in appearance before slicing to ginger root. I use it in soups and stews and egg dishes and believe it adds healthful benefits. It’s nice to know that it can, provided cautions are observed.

I just love Sam Smith, and his new 2017 album is great. Here’s him doing “Pray”, one of the numbers he performed a few weeks back on SNL. Did you notice how slim he is? He lost over 50 pounds dropping dairy, gluten and sugar and doing much of his own meal prep. Enjoy his delicious voice!

Namasté

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2 thoughts on “Your Weekly Diversion, Week 42

  1. On the origin of the word I found this on the online etymology dictionary:

    “turmeric (n.)
    pungent powder made from the root of an East Indian plant, 1530s, altered from Middle English turmeryte (early 15c.), of uncertain origin, perhaps from Middle French terremérite “saffron,” from Medieval Latin terra merita, literally “worthy earth,” though the reason why it would be called this is obscure. Klein suggests it might be a folk-etymology corruption of Arabic kurkum “curcuma, saffron”.

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