Brothers and sisters in suffering, old age, sickness and death, by Ajahn Sumedho

This piece by Ajahn Sumedho resonated with me just as Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh remains in a French hospital having suffered a brain hemorrhage. Suffering, old age, sickness and death are unavoidable, but joy and mindfulness and wisdom are still there for us. Letting go of the fear of these things is very liberating when we are able to accomplish it. And this for me is as impermanent as is all else. Therefore a daily practice is the only way I have a shot at it!

May all beings be free from suffering, and may all beings be at ease. And may our beloved Thay continue to regain health and strength.

Buddhism now

Buddha image. British MuseumThe Buddha pointed to an existential truth. It’s about existence. Suffering (dukkha) is about our human existence. And the actual meaning of `exist’ is to `stand forth’. What stands forth for us in our lives is suffering, isn’t it? We suffer a lot. We have a lot of existential suffering on this journey that we’re involved in from birth to death. And this suffering is common to every human being. It’s not just certain ones — it’s not just the poor, or just men or just women, or just Europeans or Africans or Asians — it’s everyone from the beginning of the human race, and will be to the end of it. As long as there’s ignorance, there’s going to be suffering. So this is a common experience we all share. When we talk about suffering, we don’t say, `I believe in it,’ or `I don’t believe…

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We need to put ourselves into perspective, by Ajahn Sumedho

It is so interesting to me that just when I am struggling with something, someone or something brings me the opportunity for insight I seek. Such it was when I read this post by Ajahn Sumedho. I have such gratitude that I can simply accept the process that I am experiencing in this transitory human life, without judgment, without urgency or anxiety. This life is difficult, and seemingly more so for some than for others. But it ends the same for us all eventually. Namaste.

Buddhism now

Photo by Lisa Daix mustang 2011We can use our thoughts — not in order to make decisions, or to take positions, but in order to bring into consciousness the way things are, the way of our own existence on planet Earth as human beings. Using thoughtful reflection helps us to be intuitive, to observe and to accept. If we don’t develop this ability, we end up making very harsh value judgements about ourselves and the world. This makes us insensitive and harsh, and we become unable to understand things. We get the feeling that there’s nothing we can do, and we feel depressed and helpless.

In the modern Western world, we seem to have developed to a very high level this ability to see what is wrong. And it’s turning against us. We are destroying ourselves. We are unable to enjoy our lives, or experience joy. From reading the newspapers, one gets the impression that…

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