Your Weekly Diversion, Week 14

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On this, week 14, I’ve been on the move, literally. So I will just share the diversions as best I can.

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Detroit Michigan Map Art Print by The Mighty Mitten, themightymitten.com

 

As you no doubt are aware, the iconic birthplace of the US auto industry, Detroit, Michigan has suffered a drastic and prolonged economic downturn that has led to a real estate crash and outmigration. So this story from the Guardian really is good news!

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Spring is here and therefore it’s getting close to garden planting time up north. I still have a lot of the heirloom seeds I bought last year so I’m going to see how they do. Some people order seed catalogs and pore over them during the winter. Others think about tactics. If the idea of making trellises for tomatoes and beans and other climbers instead of buying tomato cages and bright green bamboo sticks from a big box store appeals to you, try this.

And here is your toe tapper for this week. It’s a doozie and I enjoyed it even more than the original Freddie Mercury composition we loved as Queen performed it.

Namasté

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Your Weekly Diversion, Week 5

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Our need for diversion continues, but so does the need for a bit of healthy reality testing. The world is watching a political circus unfolding in many places in the West as anger and prejudice against others less fortunate or just different seem to gain footholds against civility. The indomitable and inspiring Pope Francis speaks out against populism and xenophobia. To me, he embodies the Buddhist ideal of Metta, or loving kindness.

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Image courtesy of Imagen Subliminal

What would it be like to be immersed in translucent color, wandering through a colorful maze of visual intensity? This Chinese exhibit gives visitors that very experience.

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Image courtesy of musictreasures.com

The rest of the diversions I found for you this week were inspired by the Grammy Awards. Sure I found recipes, stories and other interesting things to share, but, music!

Did you see and hear Maren Morris win her Grammy with “My Church,” Best Country Solo Performance this year? I really enjoyed her fresh and courageous style.

Reading a list of awards given out before the broadcast, I saw that one of our national treasures, Willie Nelson, won a Grammy for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album with “Summertime: Willie Nelson Sings Gershwin.”

Listening to a commercial, I heard this amazing song, “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free,” by Nina Simone, and while I do not recall what product was being advertised, the song really moved me. What a woman, what writing, and what a voice!

Namasté

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Opening Up to Learning

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Image from PNG Mart

Take a habit, tweak it a bit and open your world! When my habitual evening iPad crawl lost a regular haunt when the NBC News Breaking News app was put to bed for the last time on New Year’s Eve, I found some new haunts and my eyes opened anew.

A favorite haunt I still enjoy is Recolor. Here’s an image I colored this week, using my Apple Pencil:

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Recolor image colored by Shielagh

Recolor isn’t totally, freshly creative if you use their line drawings, but you can upload your own drawings and color those. The color palette in the free version is quite extensive, many with gradient effects such as those above. The creativity is in which colors you choose to put where. There are extra metallic and pearly ones, and more, that you can buy, but I haven’t wanted to buy any so far. I’m not a great one for in-app purchases for anything.

I still enjoy the daily New York Times Crossword and credit it with helping to keep my aging brain more agile than it might otherwise be. And I torture myself with “hard” level sudoku, usually resorting to “medium” and I soon lose interest.

But, back to the learning of new things!

I’ve been capturing interesting articles and saving them on Google Keep, which by the way is an amazing tool. This week I found the following:

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Photo by Todd Hido, New York Times

A feature on Dr. B J Miller in the New York Times Magazine fanned an ember in my being of working with death and dying, as I did for several years in an outpatient HIV-AIDS unit. His own painful life journey has formed the foundation of a most unusual and giving human being. This TED Talk with Dr. B J is worth checking out.

Not all my finds are as profound as the amazing work of  Dr. B J. Some are just delightful in their own right, or useful, or fun, or seriously instructive.

Now-13-year-old Grace Vanderwaal wowed me with her performance of an original composition on “America’s Got Talent.” Watch this one! She’s already on a rocketship to stardom.

On the blog Style by Emily Henderson I found her style quiz. She nailed me! How about you?

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Photo: Kaylyn Messer

Photographer Kaylyn Messer happened upon an exquisitely perfect circle of ice in a river.

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Blogs abound with how-tos but this one really intrigued me. Nika Rouss shows us how to paint a still life using a combination of stencils, sponged on colors, finger treatment, markers and more. Very cool!

As a psychologist who treats anxiety disorders, I found this short video on social anxiety to be very clear and even fun as it addresses this painful problem so many struggle with. In fact, I have found that for many alcoholics I’ve treated, disabling social anxiety often preceded their addiction. So when they get sober, that social anxiety may return with a vengeance and therefore needs to be understood and compensated for. It’s okay. Even though we believe ourselves to be in the spotlight, usually we’re all just bozos on the bus.

And now, because you’ve been so good at wading through my week’s discoveries, here’s a treat for your ears and those stompin’ feet!

Namasté

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Daruma or Bodhidharma: Early Zen Master

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This craggy early Zen Master, known as Daruma in Japan and Bodhidarma elsewhere in the Buddhist world, has been immortalized by Zen scholar Hakuin.

Learn more about the gifted monastic artist who painted Daruma and other Buddhist figures many times during his 15 years of artistic expression in this post at Buddhism Now https://buddhismnow.com/2016/05/01/the-sound-of-one-hand-paintings-and-calligraphy-by-zen-master-hakuin/

In the accompanying video at Buddhism Now and produced by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), curator Rob Singer gives the background and context of the artist Hakuin.

Namasté

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Buddhist Photographs of Japan in 1865

These are amazing! After enjoying looking at them, I visited the Los Angeles County Museum of Art website linked on the post. There are many more than appear here.

I have very fond memories of my painter mother taking me to the museum in the 1950s and ’60s, first at its original location at the LA Exposition Center, and then at its present location on Wilshire Blvd in the Miracle Mile. When my son, almost 40 now, was a baby, I took him to the same museum to begin to share with him the magic of original art by some of the best painters ever to put brush to canvas. Please enjoy these and visit the LACMA site where you can see more and even download any that are in the public domain.

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Click on any image to see larger photographs.

You can see many more of these wonderful photograph on the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) website.

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Exquisite Beauty Transcending Time

 

99 of 100 Views of Edo, by Utagawa Hiroshige

99 of 100 Views of Edo, by Utagawa Hiroshige

We will not be on this earth forever. Our time here is brief. Perhaps we will leave beauty for those who come after us to enjoy. It may be our wisdom, or it may be our art. I grew up with a print of this beautiful wood cut by Utagawa Hiroshige. A little girl stared and stared at this beautiful image of snow over Edo, as Tokyo was known then. Little did she know then that she would come to follow the teachings of the Buddha to whom this temple was built, when she was a grown woman. The beauty with which we adorn our homes and our lives can have amazing influence. May we choose carefully.

Kinryuzan Temple, Asakusa (Asakusa Kinryuzan), No. 99 from One Hundred Famous View of Edo
The color scheme of this composition—red on white—is reserved for propitious occasions, in this case the beginning of winter. The place is the entrance to the temple of the Buddhist deity Kannon in Asakusa, the oldest and most venerable Buddhist temple in Edo. Formally known as Kinryūzan Sensōji, it dates back to 628, when two brothers discovered a tiny gold image of Kannon in their net while fishing on the Sumida River. The image was enshrined here, and over the centuries the temple became the object of a widespread popular following that remains strong today. As with all popular temples in Hiroshige’s time, the Asakusa Kannon Temple was also a major entertainment center.

From the collection of the Brooklyn Museum.

Yes, may we choose very carefully.

Namaste,

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