Authentic Hummus

 

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I just made hummus for the first time! Recently I ordered some tahini after searching for a non-bitter product, and after reading reviews, bought Soom Organic Tahini, and it is great! Now I felt ready to try making hummus.

There are countless recipes out there for hummus, and I’m sure most are very good, but this one at Vegangela got my attention. Angela writes that the secret to silky smooth hummus is peeling the chickpeas first. I would have moved on to the next recipe but then I read how she couched peeling the peas as a Zen, mindful experience, and I’m so down with that approach. Truly, peeling the whole can took me less than 10 minutes, so what’s the big deal?

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When I finished slipping the chickpeas out of their skins, which is easy once you learn how to keep the peeled peas in the bowl and not bouncing around the kitchen, I added the skins to my freezer bag of vegetable scraps destined for my next homemade veggie broth. We’ve been enjoying a lot of fresh vegetables this summer, from our garden as well as farmers markets and the generosity of friends with green thumbs, so it only takes me about three weeks to fill up a gallon bag of veggie scraps to make my broth. To make my broth, I empty the bag into a large soup pot, cover the veggies with water, bring to a boil and simmer for an hour and a half or two, usually with plenty of herbs and peppercorns because I always strain it. I figured the chickpea skins would add some nutrition and flavor to the broth.

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I adapted Vegangela’s Basic Hummus recipe, making a  few additions after my husband and I tasted it:

  • 1 15-oz can of chickpeas, rinsed, drained and peeled
  • 3 tbsp Soom Organic tahini
  • 1 small lemon, juiced
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 tbsp water, plus more if needed
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • Braggs Liquid Aminos to taste, for extra umami (optional)
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Smoked paprika, olive oil and pinenuts to garnish (optional)

I put everything except the garnish items in the food processor and blended it all on high speed, scraping the sides often until very smooth. After tasting I added more salt, the Bragg’s, and more cumin. Totally yum!

After turning the hummus into a glass bowl and swirling the top, I drizzled it with olive oil, sprinkled on some pinenuts, and dusted it all with smoked paprika.

Voila!

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If you make this awesome hummus, please let me know how yours turns out!

Your Weekly Diversion, Week 26

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Welcome to Week 26 of our circus. Our monkeys have been swinging wildly from tree to tree, spinning, obfuscating, flirting, lying, blaming, chattering about nonsense, and it all makes my eyes roll in my head.

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I need diversions, and I’m sure you do as well so here we go. First, we need cake! Yes, we do, and we need confetti cake, with or without Elmo and friends.

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Or maybe we need Iced Lemon Pound Cake (vegan). I’m not sure which I’ll make first.

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Now that we’re drooling, I have good news and bad news for us. The bad news: Cheese is addicting. Dr. Neal Barnard has been exploding our craving with facts we don’t want to hear. Apparently certain aspects of cheese are transformed into a morphine-like chemical that reinforces our desire to have more cheese. The advertising world and restaurants know this. Witness the oozy, cheesy ads for pizza and other foods. As a vegan who began eating cheese again, and I feel guilty about it because I do know about the pseudomorphine stuff, and I know dairy is inherently cruel. A calf has to be taken from his mother so humans can have the milk. There’s a lot of suffering in that unnatural separation. The good news:  Miyoko’s Kitchen. She’s making cultured Buffalo Style Mozzarella we need to try.

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We can also enjoy Field Roast Chao cheeses that are produced  in Greece from coconut milk and tofu. I know it sounds weird, but it’s the tastiest, meltiest, sliced vegan cheese available in most supermarkets. It makes great grilled cheese sandwiches, especially when the bread is slathered with Just Mayo egg-free mayonnaise before grilling. And I totally trust this product which we use exclusively at home.

Who knew this would be another food blog? Well, it is what it is, and food is a great diversion, isn’t it? Yummy food isn’t called comfort food for nothing. So, we have to eat, so why not eat healthy and eat happy, too!

This week we sold all the CDs that Decluttr.com would buy and donated the rest. We listen to satellite radio at home and in our cars, and Amazon Music via iPad and Bluetooth speaker, so they’ve just gathered dust. I saved one out to give a friend. It was “Shteyt Oyf (Rise Up)” by the  Klezmatics, and I’m going to share now “I Ain’t Afraid” in English and Yiddish, originally written by Holly Near, that I’ve loved since I first heard it. Don’t you think the world needs to hear this? Please share!!!

Namasté 

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Capers, Good and Good for You

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I love capers! I bought some for a delish pasta recipe a few weeks ago and now that I have them in the house, I’ve put them in other things. Last night I dolled up a bottle of organic Muir Glen tomato basil pasta sauce with a generous dose of capers, plus some chopped olives, and sautéed onion, garlic and whole package of mixed mushrooms with all sorts of interesting types along with the sliced buttons and portobellos. What a yummy mix!

In the 2006 article, “Importance of functional foods in the Mediterranean diet” (Public Health Nutrition: 9(8A), 1136–1140 DOI: 10.1017/S1368980007668530) available here, we learn that capers are good for you, too (emphasis mine):

Garlic, onions, herbs and spices are used as condiments in the [Mediterranean Diet], and may increase the nutritional value of food. Some also contain large quantities of flavonoids (fennel, chives, etc.) or allicin (raw garlic and onion); the latter may have cardiovascular benefits and help improve cognitive function3. The caper, Capparis spinosa L., which is found all over the Mediterranean basin and is consumed in salads or on pizzas, etc. has been used in traditional medicine for its diuretic and anti- hypertensive effects, and to treat certain conditions related to uncontrolled lipid peroxidation15. Caper extract contains flavonoids (kaempferol and quercetin derivatives) and hydrocinnamic acids with known anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Panico et al.15 concluded capers to have a chondroprotective effect; they might therefore be of use in the management of cartilage damage during the inflammatory phase (p. 1137).

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If you want some great recipes exploring the flavor and versatility of capers, check out this HuffPost article. That yummy-looking photo is from Recipe Number 18! The article credits this one to Cafe Johnsonia.

And I predict that capers might just feature in a tasty meal on your table very soon!

Buon Appetito!

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For the Daily Post

Your Weekly Diversion, Week 24

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It’s week 24 and I’m in Tennessee watching my cousins and friends play gin rummy at my aunt’s 92nd birthday party. I bask in the warmth of family love. It helps to offset the insulting rhetoric that one who probably knows better is slinging toward folk who don’t deserve it. No people deserve to be insulted in schoolyard fashion, especially by the purported leader of their nation. Then someone shoots several of his former medical colleagues and kills one, and then kills himself, in a hospital where people are try to get well and live. Yikes!

Diversions on the way….

 

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Photo from pixabay.com

Are you interested in learning about Zen meditation? Norman Fisher explains it well in Lion’s Roar.

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Photo from Smitten Kitchen

This is the season for gardening and for grilling, and when you can combine a margherita pizza grilled outside with a salad of tomatoes and greens from your own garden, why wouldn’t you? We had a great Tennessee BBQ with my cousin’s husband serving as grillmaster, presiding over grilling hamburgers, artisan chicken sausages, and for the vegetarians, Fieldburgers, chipotle marinated tofu steaks and veggie skewers wth homegrown veggies. We didn’t grill any pizza, but the idea is really intriguing, so here’s how.

 

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A week or so ago, I covered the Danish concept of hygge,  what I interpret to include a rather enchanting sense of comfort, simplicity, beauty and cozy utility. There are many interpretations of hygge (pronounced “hoo-gah). While in an independent Tennessee bookstore filled with special finds, I found Meik Wiking’s book, pictured above.

And for some music to bring some hygge into your world, you might find this Hawaiian song by Kason Gomes helpful.

Namasté

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Your Weekly Diversion, Week 10

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A whirlwind week to be sure. Hearings, press conferences, tweets, accusations, retractions, awkward posturings, leader of the free world clowning in the cab of a semi like a ten-year-old kid, lies and obfuscations, more tortured logic, dead Russians, Russian guy thrown out a window and surviving, Russian guy poisoned (twice) and living to tell the tale, spy vs. spy, intel insanity, naïveté and contortive backstabbing. Whew!

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So to the diversions. First, is there a vacant lot that bugs you? Is your neighbor’s yard an eyesore? You need to learn how to be a guerilla gardener. It looks like a lot of fun and good for the planet besides. Like these nasturtiums. They could brighten that sorry corner.

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Sort of stressed about now? Maybe you need to meditate. You already do? Fantastic. Then hit that cushion and get your om on. My meditation practice has transformed my life in a good way. How else are we going to find our center in the midst of the circus? And remember, they ARE our monkeys. If you don’t have a sitting practice yet, Lion’s Roar has a meditation how-to to get you started.

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I enjoy cooking, and I collect cookbooks and I pin recipes I find online on Pinterest all the time. Now Mother Jones tells me I’m doing it all wrong. Curious?  Check this out.

And now for your musical reward for reading this blog today. Rock music! Neil Mendoza built a contraption that actually uses rocks to make music. You won’t believe it! Ok, maybe you will. “Here Comes the Sun!” Enjoy!

Namasté

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