Authentic Hummus

 

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I just made hummus for the first time! Recently I ordered some tahini after searching for a non-bitter product, and after reading reviews, bought Soom Organic Tahini, and it is great! Now I felt ready to try making hummus.

There are countless recipes out there for hummus, and I’m sure most are very good, but this one at Vegangela got my attention. Angela writes that the secret to silky smooth hummus is peeling the chickpeas first. I would have moved on to the next recipe but then I read how she couched peeling the peas as a Zen, mindful experience, and I’m so down with that approach. Truly, peeling the whole can took me less than 10 minutes, so what’s the big deal?

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When I finished slipping the chickpeas out of their skins, which is easy once you learn how to keep the peeled peas in the bowl and not bouncing around the kitchen, I added the skins to my freezer bag of vegetable scraps destined for my next homemade veggie broth. We’ve been enjoying a lot of fresh vegetables this summer, from our garden as well as farmers markets and the generosity of friends with green thumbs, so it only takes me about three weeks to fill up a gallon bag of veggie scraps to make my broth. To make my broth, I empty the bag into a large soup pot, cover the veggies with water, bring to a boil and simmer for an hour and a half or two, usually with plenty of herbs and peppercorns because I always strain it. I figured the chickpea skins would add some nutrition and flavor to the broth.

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I adapted Vegangela’s Basic Hummus recipe, making a  few additions after my husband and I tasted it:

  • 1 15-oz can of chickpeas, rinsed, drained and peeled
  • 3 tbsp Soom Organic tahini
  • 1 small lemon, juiced
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 tbsp water, plus more if needed
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • Braggs Liquid Aminos to taste, for extra umami (optional)
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Smoked paprika, olive oil and pinenuts to garnish (optional)

I put everything except the garnish items in the food processor and blended it all on high speed, scraping the sides often until very smooth. After tasting I added more salt, the Bragg’s, and more cumin. Totally yum!

After turning the hummus into a glass bowl and swirling the top, I drizzled it with olive oil, sprinkled on some pinenuts, and dusted it all with smoked paprika.

Voila!

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If you make this awesome hummus, please let me know how yours turns out!

A to Z Challenge: F is for Ferns

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Here in Pocono Pines, Pennsylvania we have several kinds of ferns. 

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Sensitive Fern

The large leafed fern above is called a sensitive fern, or Onoclea sensibilis. Some variations have finer fronds. The name comes from early American settlers who noticed that frost quickly killed them. It is also sometimes referred to as the bead fern.

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New York Fern

Around my garden Buddha are fine examples of the New York Fern or Thelypteris novoboracensis. The orange flower to the right of the statue is called Spotted Touch Me Not, or Impatiens capensis, also called orange jewelweed. Below is a large roadside expanse of New York Ferns.

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Pocono Pines features shady lanes and roadways, thanks to the tall pines and lush deciduous forests up here. Ferns love and thrive in shade and in damp and swampy soil, so our woods and roadsides that are crisscrossed by streams and runoffs are filled with them.

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Inspired by my WordPress friend Ruth, I decided to take the A to Z Challenge around my little town of Pocono Pines, Pennsylvania. In the 2010 Census, the population was 1,409 persons. We have one gas station, an art gallery/gift store with wonderful artisan wares, a magisterial court office, an ice cream stand, a pizza place, a family restaurant, one bank, several real estate offices, a US post office, a produce stand, an elementary school, a public library, several residential developments, and a number of other businesses. We are located in the Pocono Mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania, about 35 miles from New Jersey and two hours from New York City. We have two lakes and are 1,805 feet above sea level

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