Spared By Dorian, Buffeted by Dementia

Compare this photo and the following video I took today with the video I took two weeks ago here. The walkable beach here in Naples on the Florida Gulf coast is narrower, and most of the shells I saw as I walked along the water’s edge were broken. The wind was very strong and you can really hear it. I had brought my lunch to the beach and settled at a covered table where I could see the water. I had to hold onto my purse, sandwich and drink while I ate to keep anything from being blown away, not easy to do with two hands. We are about 125 miles from the Atlantic coast of Florida and much further from the hurricane itself, and have been getting some effects from the outer bands, but there’s no danger to life or property here as far as I’ve heard. The east coast has been hunkered down for days, and we were briefly. Unfortunately cognitive impairment prevents some from understanding here from there, or us from them, or safety from danger. I am so grateful for the people and organizations here who understand this and provide so much help and support.

When I saw videos of the devastation in the several of the Bahama islands after they were strafed by category five hurricane winds for over 48 hours, I could hardly take it in. The drone view was from a height that made much of the debris field unrecognizable, but it’s hard to imagine how many people can have survived. This devastation strikes me as being analogous to that being visited upon the brain suffering from progressive dementia. It’s hard to imagine anything surviving, and yet much does, at least for a while. And for any of this, and for all those who help us weather the storm, we are very grateful.

Savoring the Joy as I find It

Sometimes a day is unstructured and we don’t know what to expect. I wondered what to do with myself for four hours today without any responsibilities or expectations. I dropped in on a support group, late, but still. Then I took myself out for lunch alone, a surprisingly authentic pastrami on rye. Next I parked by the beach and took a brief walk on the sand. As local residents, parking is always free for us. Here’s the video I took, which I sent to my granddaughter who just let us know she is engaged to be married. I am thrilled for her! He’s a Marine and she’ll be living closer to us soon. Then I went to my therapy office nearby and did some creative writing. The plot began to fall into place as my fingers flew across the keyboard. A character revealed the why and the how! When all was said and done, I resumed my busy life of caregiving, recharged and grateful.

Enjoy:

The goodness in me bows to the goodness in you, and to that in all living beings.

Your Weekly Diversion, Week 45

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It’s Week 45 of this blog, and I hope as you read this you had a wonderful week. Many of us in the US had our Thanksgiving dinners this past Thursday, and some of us saw our football teams lose in holiday matchups. <Sigh.> It’s hard to be a New York Football Giants fan this year. If you celebrated Thanksgiving, I hope it was a tasty and grateful day. And let us remember that football is only a game.

As we enjoy this weekend, we are struck by how fortunate we are. Many are not so fortunate, whether they are suffering from health problems, financial distress, wars far and wide, the pain of mental illness or addiction, or loss from natural disaster such as Hurricane Irma.

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My cousin Paula and I were little girls together in California in the ‘50s. I wish I had a copy of the black and white photo of the two of us at our house when we were so young, maybe three and six. Now we live just an hour apart in Florida where she retired three years ago. Then this past September, Hurricane Irma severely damaged her home. We set up a GoFundMe campaign today for her, and we hope she will be able to get her place fixed so she can stay in Florida. Here’s a link to her page.

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Do you meditate? I often urge clients to try meditation to help them relax and better cope with stress. Apparently I am not the only healthcare provider who does that: Here’s Why I Prescribe Meditation to all my Patients.

I’m ending this with this tune from the Temptations, one of my all time faves!

 

Namasté

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Your Weekly Diversion, Week 40


It’s week 40. I’m having technical difficulties with WordPress today, so I’m not sure how far I will get. 

We’ve just recently returned to Southwest Florida. There are signs of Irma everywhere. Blue tarps, stacks and piles of trees and branches and other debris by the sides of nearly every street. The big multiplex movie theater still hasn’t reopened due to hurricane damage. Our neighbors who remained here all summer have told us of sandbagging lanais, about the fallen magnolia trees (only a few remain out of scores across the lake), now just stumps, and the six foot piles of  debris including the contents of refrigerators and freezers, thanks to the electricity being off for more than four days. They’ve told us the smell of all that garbage and debris was extremely disgusting. Many people are still awaiting insurance money, if they were lucky enough to have insurance coverage, and if they have it, it’s hard to find available skilled people to do the work. Because of all this, we feel extremely fortunate to find our home intact, dry and undamaged. Well,  it wasn’t exactly undamaged. The AC wasn’t working, nor were our cable, internet and phone. When I went to do a load of laundry, I found out half the laundry room wiring was fried. Thankfully, good people came and helped us, and all these problems have been resolved. The food in our refrigerator and freezer were discarded by the man who watches our place and got it ready for Irma’s arrival. So between repairs and replenishing our staples, hundred of dollars have flown from our wallets, and that’s life. People have urged us to notify our insurance company of all these expenses, but I doubt they’ll exceed our deductible. And all we need to do to keep this all in perspective is remember what our American brothers and sisters are suffering in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Millions remain without adequate food, water, shelter, and power. 

These are my diversions carefully curated for you this week, despite being on the road and staying in pet-friendly hotels, and coming home to big problems.

Graphic courtesy of Creative Commons – vaXine

Magic mushrooms, specifically the psilocybin they contain, are helping people suffering from severe depression that has been resistant to all conventional treatments. And more than that, it appears that this chemical actually helps “reset” the brain. Wow!

It’s been a great time here for the birds. The floodwaters washed fish into areas where they wouldn’t ordinarily be found, such as retention ponds and catchment basins, and when the waters receded, the fish remained. Right up the street from us, where the woods meet the sidewalk, is just such a place. This small, squarish retention pond is lined with rocks, and surrounded by tall pines, squat palms and shrubs. And high in the trees roost a large flock of wood storks, huge birds with wingspans of about 5 feet and long down-curving beaks with which they fish. It’s estimated that there are fewer than 6,000 wood storks are left in the US, as fishing areas such as ours diminish and are replaced by development. So we feel very lucky to have up to 30 of these majestic birds perching on our roof, flying overhead, and roosting in the trees. I took these photos today while we were taking a walk around the lake. The first photo is of a bald eagle that a noisy flock of great egrets drove from our lake when he attempted to fish there. He was far more beautiful than my iPhone photo shows.


The second photo shows the woodsy retention pond surrounded by great egrets, the white birds with yellow beaks, and wood storks. Both species stand about four feet tall. The feeding frenzy marked by all the croaks and clacks gives new meaning to shooting fish in a barrel.

IMAGE: DIGITAL GREENHOUSE/PARTY/WEBSITE


Currently in Tokyo an unusual exhibit is drawing a lot of attention at night. Mostly an ordinary greenhouse by day, this one plays music and gives a colorful light display when the plants are gently touched. Each vegetable plays a different note. Together the sound is amazing. Check it out!

❤️ And this week someone very special and dear to us popped up, out of the blue, and brought us a happy surprise. You know who you are. ❤️

Last night when I first wrote this post and published it I was too tired to add a musical number, but this morning it came to me that “Turn, Turn, Turn” by the Byrds would be just the thing. To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under heaven.

                                                                                           Namasté 


Your Weekly Diversion, Weekly 37



Now we find ourselves at Week 37. It’s been quite a challenge for the planet and for human kind. My mom’s 92 year old baby sister just fell and broke her pelvis. We are all praying for her healing and return to the active life she loves. Then my cousin finally got down to her home in Florida only to find leaks and other damage. Another cousin found that her Florida art gallery and museum and all the contents survived undamaged, although trees and plants on the grounds were devastated. Friends with property and family in Puerto Rico are anxious about their wellbeing. And then there’s the political circus with its twirling and gesticulating, gyrating and posturing, bellowing and sanctifying its innocence in the face of a blunt reality that begs to differ.

Painting  by Yukon artist Natalie Parenteau

Do you smudge? If not, here’s why you might want to start. Science backs up the belief many share that smudging is good for our health and can be good for the air we breathe. I do it in the office between clients sometimes, especially if the vibe has been especially intense or just to give me a lift. The wonderful work of Canadian artist Natalie Parenteau as seen above can be found here.

The colorful seaside neighborhood of La Perla in Puerto Rico inspired singer Luis Fonsi to write and perform his iconic “Despacito”. Before you get to enjoy the video make earlier this summer, here’s how La Perla looks after Hurricane Maria, in a sobering video clip.

Now, the joyous “before” to remind us all how much work will need to be done for the people of Puerto Rico and this pastel paradise to be restored to gain. “Despacito”:

                                                            Namasté

A to Z Challenge: F is for Ferns

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Here in Pocono Pines, Pennsylvania we have several kinds of ferns. 

Made with Repix (http://repix.it)

Sensitive Fern

The large leafed fern above is called a sensitive fern, or Onoclea sensibilis. Some variations have finer fronds. The name comes from early American settlers who noticed that frost quickly killed them. It is also sometimes referred to as the bead fern.

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New York Fern

Around my garden Buddha are fine examples of the New York Fern or Thelypteris novoboracensis. The orange flower to the right of the statue is called Spotted Touch Me Not, or Impatiens capensis, also called orange jewelweed. Below is a large roadside expanse of New York Ferns.

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Pocono Pines features shady lanes and roadways, thanks to the tall pines and lush deciduous forests up here. Ferns love and thrive in shade and in damp and swampy soil, so our woods and roadsides that are crisscrossed by streams and runoffs are filled with them.

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Inspired by my WordPress friend Ruth, I decided to take the A to Z Challenge around my little town of Pocono Pines, Pennsylvania. In the 2010 Census, the population was 1,409 persons. We have one gas station, an art gallery/gift store with wonderful artisan wares, a magisterial court office, an ice cream stand, a pizza place, a family restaurant, one bank, several real estate offices, a US post office, a produce stand, an elementary school, a public library, several residential developments, and a number of other businesses. We are located in the Pocono Mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania, about 35 miles from New Jersey and two hours from New York City. We have two lakes and are 1,805 feet above sea level

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